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Literary Agents for Children's Books | Find Children's Literary AgentsLiterary Agents for Children’s Books 2019-2020 – Use our free List of Literary Agents to find children’s literary agents accepting submissions for fiction and nonfiction: young adult book agents (YA), middle grade book agents (MG), picture book agents, and chapter book agents. Finding a literary agent for children’s books is easy using our literary agency database. It includes all literary agents for children’s literature including the Best Literary Agents at the Top Literary Agencies.

Children’s book authors who’ve used our Literary Agent Directory have been offered representation from some of the most powerful children’s literature book agents in the USA. For example, Rosemary Stimola who represents Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games; and Jennifer DeChiara, whose agency was named one of the top 25 literary agencies in the country by Writer’s Digest. Scroll below to see all children’s literary publishing agents looking for new writers, and find a literary agency for children’s books to represent your writing.

You can use our literary agent database for all Children’s Literary Agents Near Me searches including: New York and NYC Publishing Agents, Los Angeles Publishing Agents, Atlanta Publishing Agents, Boston Publishing Agents, and Chicago Publishing Agents. And, if you don’t want to submit your book to the largest, most established, or most powerful kids’ book agents or agencies, you can use our book agents directory to query new children’s book agents or a book agent with a Boutique Literary Agency. Lastly, we’ve included an informative article below called How to Find a Literary Agent for Children’s Books. Everything you need to find book agents and literary agencies seeking kids’ books.

This guide to literary agents for children’s literature includes:

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Literary Agents for Children’s Books 2019-2020 | Find a Book Agent

Children's Literary Agents | Find Literary Agents for Children's Books

Find all children’s book agents accepting submissions here. This comprehensive guide begins with facts and statistics about kids’ book agents. It then reveals the most powerful literary agencies and agents for kids’ book authors. It provides tips about how to find a literary agent for children’s books. And it provides FREE INSTANT ACCESS to detailed information about all kids’ book literary agencies so you can query any children’s book literary agency.

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Children’s Literary Agents 2019-2020 | Facts and Statistics

Finding a literary agent for children’s books is easier when you know the facts. For example: Which kids’s book agents are looking for new writers? Which kids’ book agents for children’s literature have the best track record of sales? Which children’s book agents accept email, postal mail, and online form submissions? Which kids’ book agents are members of the AAR? And so on. Use our literary agency database to find this information, and more.

For example:

  • 348 literary agencies represent children’s book authors
  • 883 publishing agents represent kids’s book writers
  • 231 writer representatives for children’s book authors are AAR members
  • 696 children’s literary agents for kids’s book writers accept email queries
  • 190 publishing agents for kids’s book authors accept postal mail queries
  • 204 author representatives for children’s book writers accept queries via online website form
  • 674 children’s literary agents for kids’s book authors are on Twitter
  • 179 publishing agents for children’s book writers are on Facebook
  • 625 author representatives for kids’s book authors are on LinkedIn

Scroll below to find children’s literature agents for your genre.

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Young Adult Book Agents 2019-2020 | Children’s Literary Agents

There are 784 book agents in the United States who represent YA writers. Most publishing agents representing young adult authors accept submissions without referrals. You can find all YA author representatives now using our free literary agencies directory below. The database includes all writer representatives for young adult books in the United States, including the most powerful YA book agents at the most successful children’s book agencies. You can use the literary agency directory to see which agents handle either young adult fiction and young adult nonfiction. You can search the database for YA book agents by location, AAR membership status, etc. And, our literary agency directory includes bios and contact information for all young adult book agents looking for new writers. Click here to see all Young Adult Literary Agents.

Middle Grade Book Agents 2019-2020 | Children’s Literary Agents

There are 600 book agents in the United States who represent MG writers. Most author representatives representing young adult writers accept submissions without referrals. You can find all MG writer representatives now using our free literary agencies directory below. The database includes all author representatives for middle grade writers in the United States, including the most powerful MG book agents at the most successful children’s book agencies. You can use the literary agency directory to see which agents handle either middle fiction and middle nonfiction. You can search the database for MG book agents by location, AAR membership status, etc. And, our literary agency directory includes bios and contact information for all middle grade book agents looking for new authors. Click here to see all Middle Grade Literary Agents.

Chapter Book Agents 2019-2020 | Children’s Literary Agents

There are many literary agencies and publishing agents in the United States seeking chapter books. However, it can be difficult to determine which writer representatives are looking for chapter books because they don’t always indicate that information in their agent biographies. Many just say they’re interested in “Children’s Books” or “Juvenile Books.” Most writer representatives seeking chapter book writers and authors of early readers accept queries without referrals. You can find all author representatives seeking chapter books in our free literary agency directory below. The database includes all author representatives for chapter books in the US, including the most successful chapter book agents working at the most influential children’s book literary agencies. You can search the database for chapter book agents by AAR membership status, location, and more. Our literary agency directory also includes detailed publishing agent bios and contact information for all book agents looking for new chapter book authors. Click here to see Chapter Book Literary Agents.

Picture Book Agents 2019-2020 | Children’s Literary Agents

There are 317 book agents in the United States who represent picture book writers. Most publishing agents representing picture book authors accept submissions without referrals. You can find all PB author representatives now using our free literary agencies directory below. The database includes all writer representatives for picture books in the United States, including the most powerful PB book agents at the most successful children’s book agencies. You can search the database for picture book agents by location, AAR membership status, etc. And, our literary agency directory includes bios and contact information for all PB agents looking for new writers. Click here to see all Picture Book Literary Agents.

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Literary Agents for Children’s Literature 2019-2020 | How to Choose

Children’s book authors often make incorrect assumptions about kids’ book literary agencies. For example, many kids’s book writers believe the most powerful book agents for children’s literature won’t give new kids’s book writers’ careers the attention they deserve. Sometimes, that’s true. But I’d rather be represented by one of the most influential children’s publishing agents with great connections and a great track record than one who’s just getting started and has no track record. That’s why I’ve included the most powerful publishing agents for kids’s books and the most powerful literary agencies for children’s books below.

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Children’s Literary Agents Accepting Submissions 2019-2020

Another mistake children’s book authors frequently make is assuming the most powerful children’s book agents don’t read query letters–that they simply delete them or have an assistant read them. Kids’ book writers also often assume the most successful children’s publishing agents won’t offer to represent new authors who aren’t already published. Those things aren’t usually true, either. Yes, some children’s literature book agents are untouchable. The vast majority, however, are not. I know, because I’ve helped a lot of self-described “nobodies” as authors get offers for representation from some of the most powerful children’s book literary agencies and agents.

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75 Most Powerful Literary Agents for Children’s Books 2019-2020

These are the 75 most successful children’s book agents (most powerful at the top), based on the number of six-figure children’s book deals they’ve reported in recent years. Not all these publishing agents represent all children’s book genres: picture books, chapter books, middle grade, and young adult. Use our literary agency directory to see which of these publishing agents for children’s literature represent your genre.

    1. Holly McGhee (Pippin Properties)
    2. Stephen Barbara (Inkwell Management)
    3. Rosemary Stimola (Stimola Literary Studio)
    4. Tracey Adams (Adams Literary)
    5. Sarah Davies (Greenhouse Literary Agency)
    6. Emily van Beek (Folio Literary Management)
    7. Laura Rennert (Andrea Brown Literary Agency)
    8. Josh Adams (Adams Literary)
    9. Sara Crowe (Pippin Properties)
    10. Daniel Lazar (Writers House)
    11. Kristin Nelson (Nelson Literary Agency)
    12. Suzie Townsend (New Leaf Literary & Media)
    13. Brianne Johnson (Writers House)
    14. Barry Goldblatt (Barry Goldblatt Literary)
    15. Ammi-Joan Paquette (Erin Murphy Literary Agency)
    16. Steven Malk (Writers House)
    17. Ted Malawer (Upstart Crow Literary)
    18. Brooks Sherman (Janklow & Nesbit)
    19. Rebecca Sherman (Writers House)
    20. Joanna Volpe (New Leaf Literary & Media)
    21. Pete Knapp (Park & Fine Literary and Media)
    22. Mandy Hubbard (Emerald City Literary Agency)
    23. Gemma Cooper (The Bent Agency)
    24. John Cusick (Folio Literary Management)
    25. Molly Ker Hawn (The Bent Agency)
    26. Deidre Knight (The Knight Agency)
    27. Russell Galen (Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency)
    28. Elena Giovinazzo (Pippin Properties)
    29. Richard Abate (3 Arts Entertainment)
    30. Jenny Bent (The Bent Agency)
    31. Cathy Hemming (Cathy D. Hemming Literary Agency)
    32. Jodi Reamer (Writers House)
    33. Jill Grinberg (Jill Grinberg Literary Management)
    34. Thao Le (Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency)
    35. Alice Tasman (Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency)
    36. Victoria Marini (Irene Goodman Agency)
    37. Corinne Marotte (L’Autre Agence)
    38. Brenda Bowen (The Book Group)
    39. Michael Stearns (The Inkhouse)
    40. Kevan Lyon (Marsal Lyon Literary Agency)
    41. Ginger Clark (Curtis Brown)
    42. Sara Shandler (Alloy Entertainment)
    43. Beth Phelan (Gallt and Zacker Literary Agency)
    44. Stephen Barr (Writers House)
    45. Caitlin Blasdell (Liza Dawson Associates)
    46. Jane Dystel (Dystel, Goderich & Bourret)
    47. Merrilee Heifetz (Writers House)
    48. Lori Kilkelly (LK Literary Agency)
    49. Josh Bank (Alloy Entertainment)
    50. Kirsten Hall (Catbird Productions)
    51. Stacia Decker (Dunow, Carlson & Lerner)
    52. Jennifer Rofe (Andrea Brown Literary Agency)
    53. Alyssa Eisner Henkin (Trident Media Group)
    54. Laurie McLean (Fuse Literary)
    55. Anna Olswanger (Olswanger Literary)
    56. Alex Glass (Glass Literary Management)
    57. Paul Rodeen (Rodeen Literary Management)
    58. Sara Megibow (kt literary)
    59. Robert Gottlieb (Trident Media Group)
    60. Adriann Ranta (Foundry Literary + Media)
    61. Penny Moore (Aevitas Creative Management)
    62. Hillary Jacobson (ICM)
    63. Alexandra Machinist (ICM)
    64. Jim McCarthy (Dystel, Goderich & Bourret)
    65. Susan Hawk (Upstart Crow Literary)
    66. Catherine Drayton (Inkwell Management)
    67. Erin Murphy (Erin Murphy Literary Agency)
    68. Helen Breitwieser (Cornerstone Literary)
    69. Stacey Glick (Dystel, Goderich & Bourret)
    70. Jennifer Laughran (Andrea Brown Literary Agency)
    71. Victoria Sanders (Victoria Sanders & Associates)
    72. Amy Berkower (Writers House)
    73. Jason Anthony (Massie & McQuilkin)
    74. Charlie Viney (Viney Shaw Agency)
    75. Kari Sutherland (Bradford Literary Agency)

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50 Most Powerful Literary Agencies for Children’s Books 2019-2020

Below you’ll find the 50 most powerfull children’s literary agencies (most successful at the top), per the number of six-figure book deals for kids’ books they’ve reported in recent years. Please note: All these publishing agencies do NOT represent all book genres for children: young adult, middle grade, chapter books, and picture books. Make sure you use our literary agency database to see which of these literary agencies for kids’ books represent your genre.

    1. Writers House (New York, NY)
    2. Pippin Properties (New York, NY)
    3. Adams Literary (Charlotte, NC)
    4. Andrea Brown Literary Agency (Palo Alto, CA)
    5. The Bent Agency (New York, NY)
    6. Folio Literary Management (New York, NY)
    7. Stimola Literary Studio (Edgewater, NJ)
    8. Nelson Literary Agency (Denver, CO)
    9. Greenhouse Literary Agency (Fairfax, VA)
    10. Foundry Literary + Media (New York, NY)
    11. New Leaf Literary & Media (New York, NY)
    12. Trident Media Group (New York, NY)
    13. Erin Murphy Literary Agency (Windham, ME)
    14. Harvey Klinger (New York, NY)
    15. Barry Goldblatt Literary (Brooklyn, NY)
    16. Inkwell Management (New York, NY)
    17. The Knight Agency (Madison, GA)
    18. Dystel & Goderich Literary Management (New York, NY)
    19. Curtis Brown (New York, NY)
    20. Sanford J. Greenburger Associates (New York, NY)
    21. Liza Dawson Associates (New York, NY)
    22. International Creative Management – ICM (New York, NY)
    23. Jill Grinberg Literary Management (Brooklyn, NY)
    24. Donald Maass Literary Agency (Brooklyn, NY)
    25. Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency (Del Mar, CA)
    26. Irene Goodman Agency (New York, NY)
    27. Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency (New York, NY)
    28. Bradford Literary Agency (San Diego, CA)
    29. Laura Dail Literary Agency (New York, NY)
    30. Rodeen Literary Management (Chicago, IL)
    31. Marsal Lyon Literary Agency (Solana Beach, CA)
    32. Upstart Crow Literary (New York, NY)
    33. Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency (New York, NY)
    34. Park Literary Group (New York, NY)
    35. Lippincott Massie McQuilkin (New York, NY)
    36. Nancy Coffey Literary & Media Representation (New York, NY)
    37. Janklow & Nesbit (New York, NY)
    38. Catbird Productions (New York, NY)
    39. Stonesong (New York, NY)
    40. Sterling Lord Literistic (New York, NY)
    41. Wolf Literary Services (New York, NY)
    42. Firebrand Literary (New York, NY)
    43. Emerald City Literary Agency (Enumclaw, WA)
    44. Triada US Literary Agency (Sewickley, PA)
    45. East-West Agency (Santa Monica, CA)
    46. DeFiore and Company (New York, NY)
    47. 3 Arts Entertainment (New York, NY)
    48. Cornerstone Literary (Los Angeles, CA)
    49. D4EO Literary Agency (Bradenton, FL)
    50. Victoria Sanders & Associates (Stone Ridge, NY)

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How to Find a Literary Agent for Children’s Books – Guide

Before you query a children’s book literary agency, read this short guide about how to find a literary agent for children’s books. You can greatly increase your odds of finding a literary agent for children’s books willing to represent you if you follow these four steps. I’ve helped approximately 150 authors get offers for representation in the last eight years, including children’s books authors writing young adult, middle grade, chapter books, and picture books. Use this checklist to find a literary agency for children’s books and see if you can get a book deal.
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Step 1: Call Your Children’s Book the Correct Genre

Many children’s book authors struggle to get offers from children’s literary agencies because they don’t categorize their books properly. Is your book a picture book, early reader, chapter book, middle grade book, young adult book, new adult book, or adult book? Or, is it more than one of those things, with “crossover” potential?

Some authors think their books are children’s books because they: feature a young protagonist, include graphic content, have a low word count, etc. However, some books with young protagonists are better suited for an adult audience, or primarily an adult audience with (you guessed it) crossover potential.

Many children’s book writers also aren’t aware enough of the different types of children’s literature. As a result, their books really don’t fit into any genre. That might seem like a good thing. You might think it’s an advantage that your book is unique. But, if your book doesn’t fit into a genre, that’s a bad thing. Click here to learn more about Children’s Book Genres.

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Step 2: Follow the Rules of Your Children’s Book Genre

Once you’re confident about the genre your children’s book fits into, it’s important to become more aware of the rules and norms for your genre. For example, what’s the expected word count for picture books, early readers, chapter books, middle grade books, and young adult books? Are the ideas and themes in your book for young readers age-appropriate? What about your vocabulary, sentence length, sentence structure, and chapter length? And, what about the age of your protagonist(s), the number of protagonists and/or characters in your book?

Every book genre for young readers comes with expectations. You don’t have to follow all the rules, but you’d be wise to at least be aware of them. Again, click here to learn more about Children’s Book Genres.

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Step 3: Create an Exceptional Pitch for Children’s Literary Agents

If you’re confident about the way you’re categorizing your children’s book and you’re sure you’re following the norms and rules for your genre, it’s time to create your pitch materials. Click here to see my take on How to Write a Query Letter and here to see how to Write a Synopsis for Book Agents. Just keep in mind, you won’t need to write a separate synopsis if you’re a children’s picture book author (you’re synopsis would be longer than the book!).

Lastly, if you have a question or comment about literary agents for children’s books, this article, or anything else, click on the following link to access my interactive FAQ page. There you’ll be able to see The 50 Questions Authors Ask Most (with my answers) and you can post your question. And, if you want me to give you feedback about about your pitch materials or children’s book, click here to see if you’re a fit for an Introductory Author Coaching Call to improve your chances of getting a children’s book agent, publisher, and book deal.

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Step 4: Pitch the Right Children’s Book Literary Agents

Once you’ve written your children’s book, categorized it properly, and prepared your pitch materials, it’s time to decide which children’s book literary agencies to query. Earlier in this guide, I recommended querying the most powerful children’s book agents. Use our book agent database to find the literary agencies that are the best fit for your genre, and to determine which kids’ book agents have the best track record of sales. All you have to do is read the agent bios in our literary agency directory to determine which children’s literary agencies are the most established and have the most children’s book agents looking for new writers. Click here for FREE INSTANT ACCESS to our Literary Agency Directory.

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Children’s Literature Literary Agents | Success Stories

Scroll below to see three case studies with teaching points for six successful children’s book authors who scheduled an introductory coaching call with me, prior to doing more with me in a longer-term author coaching program. These case studies will help you see what you might be missing with your book. These case studies are for authors of books about spirituality, but you don’t need to be faith-based to learn from them.

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Case Study #1: Authors Finding Literary Agents for Children’s Books

Book Cover of Scribble and Author by Children's Book Author Miri Lehsem-PellyMiri Leshem-Pelly is a children’s book author and illustrator of many picture books including the soon-to-be-published Penny and the Plain Piece of Paper (Penguin Books/Philomel), Scribble & Author (Kane Miller), and more. Miri got offers from three of the most powerful kids’ book agents, which should always be an author’s goal because it gives you options. Getting more than one offer also makes the literary agency you sign with believe in you more. By the way, if you haven’t heard of the children’s book publisher Kane Miller, it’s a division of EDC publishing. Their books are distributed to major retail outlets including bookstores but also gift stores, museums, and more. They also have a direct sales division with approximately 18,000 independent sales consultants that sell their books to schools and libraries, as well as at home parties, fundraising events, and school book fairs.

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Case Study #2: Authors Finding Literary Agents for Children’s Books

Book Cover of Birdie Mae Hayes - The Gift - by Children's Book Author Jeri Anne AgeeJeri Anne Agee is a children’s book author who wrote the chapter book series The Life and Times of Birdie Mae Hayes (Sky Horse Publishing). Publishers Weekly recently called Sky Horse the fastest-growing small publisher in America. They have 41 New York Times bestsellers! Jeri Anne’s success story is particularly special to me because she’d previously self-published her books. Literary agencies and publishers prefer books that haven’t yet been published, but it’s simply not true that book agents and publishers won’t consider previously published books. I was also surprised and pleased to discover that Jeri Anne’s publisher publisher two of her books at the same time. So, if you have more than one book written, especially if they’re part of a series, be sure to let agents and publishers know!

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Case Study #3: Authors Finding Literary Agents for Children’s Books

Book Cover for Dear Libby by Children's Book Author Libby KisznerLibby Kiszner is a children’s book author who wrote the juvenile nonfiction book Dear Libby: An Advice Columnist Answers the Top Questions About Friendship (Familius). Libby means a lot to me because she’s mother of nine children, and she had limited financial means when she found me on the Internet. In other words, it wasn’t easy for her to invest time or money to get a literary agent. Libby also lives abroad, and it’s harder to get a children’s book literary agency interested if you live outside the United States. That’s because literary agencies and publishers want to know your work is relatable for an American audience. They also want to know you can promote your books to readers in the United States. If you live abroad, make sure you address those topics in your query letter. And, remember, Libby had every reason not to try and get a literary agent, but she did it anyway–and she made it. Don’t quit too soon.

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Case Study #4: Authors Finding Literary Agents for Children’s Books

Photo of Children's Book Author Patricia FaithfullPatricia Faithfull is a children’s book author who wrote the middle grade novel Talia the Lionhearted: High Treason. Patricia is one of the fortunate few I’ve helped as an author coach who got a request to read her book just four minutes after querying her dream agent. Rosemary Stimola represents Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games. Of course, it took Patricia longer than four minutes to get a literary agency contract, but she was patient and persistent. After many months incorporating her prospective book agent’s suggestions, resubmitted her book to Rosemary, and got an offer for representation. Sometimes literary agencies offer representation prior to having authors make changes; other times they make the literary agency agreement contingent on the author making the changes successfully.

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Case Study #5: Authors Finding Literary Agents for Children’s Books

Book Cover for Both Sides by Children's Book Author Paul StawskiPaul Stawski is children’s book author who write young adult fiction. He is the author of the not-yet-published YA books Both Sides and Taking Sides. Paul’s success story is one of my favorites because he got his dream agent. Literally, his first choice: Jennifer De Chiara. Paul’s path to finding publishing agents for children’s books interested in him was also unusual. Some of the children’s literary agencies that asked to read his young adult novel asked for exclusivity. We weren’t able to give exclusivity because other agents were reading his book. But we were able to get every literary agency requiring exclusivity to read his book anyway. How did he do it? Simple. Paul told each agent why he liked them, but he didn’t say how many literary agencies had requested his book. Publishing agents don’t like competing with each other or investing time to read a book, only to find out an author signed with another literary agency. In the end, Paul got offers from two agents. It doesn’t happen often, but it happens.

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Case Study #6: Authors Finding Literary Agents for Children’s Books

Book Cover for The Body of Christopher Creed by Children's Book Author Carol Plum-UcciCarol Plum-Ucci is a children’s book author who’s written many award-winning young adult novels including The Body of Christopher Creed (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Carol is one of my favorite children’s book writers because she’s one of the first YA authors I helped get published when I was a new literary agent. In addition, we didn’t just get a book deal. We got a multiple-book deal! It also didn’t hurt, when Carol queried me, that she said the following in her query: “Of all the [book] agents listed in [the literary agency database I’m using], you seemed the nicest! (Or maybe it’s just one of the other entries I saw. ‘Impatient, illiterate, ignorant writers I do not allow… Remember, I’m selective and cranky!’ Gee, I think I’ll sign right up.)” Flattering book agents won’t get you a book deal, but showing literary agencies you’ve researched them, especially those you’re the most excited about, is a good idea.

Click here to see if you’re a fit for an Author Coaching Call to talk about your children’s book.

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Do Literary Agents, Assistants, or Interns Read Submissions?

One of my author coaching clients recently got a manuscript request from Georges Borchardt, Inc., a New York-based literary agency representing 200+ authors including eight Pulitzer Prize winners and two Nobel Prize winners.

Actually, the request was from an intern at the agency. That prompted my client to ask me if support staff are sometimes told to request manuscripts simply to gain experience.

More about that in a moment.

Other authors I’ve coached (I’ve now helped 160+ get literary agents) have asked about the percentage of agents who read queries and manuscripts. In other words, how many agents personally review (and carefully evaluate) pitches and projects vs delegating the responsibility to junior team members.

Without their experience, insight, and oversight?

The good news (despite most authors’ fears and assumptions) is most agents (including the most established and successful) review submissions.

Why?

Most literary agents worry (like you) that a junior team member (even a well-trained one) might reject a good book. A bestselling book. As a result, the majority (90%+) of literary agents don’t delegate query and manuscript review.

I know because I’ve been helping authors get agents via 1-on-1 coaching since 2011—and I’ve seen every manuscript request my authors have gotten during that time. Sometimes, those requests are from assistants or interns.

But, seldom so.

That said, a larger percentage use readers for manuscript evaluations. If the agent gets a positive recommendation, he or she will then (almost always) read the book.  However, some of my clients have gotten offers for representation from agents who haven’t read their book, just my query and/or the recommendation of their reader).

That’s rare.

By the way, when agents have manuscript reviewers, they’re usually well-trained. Again, the last thing an agent wants to discover is that the manuscript he or she rejected a year ago is now on The NY Times bestseller list (represented by someone else).

You should also know that agents aren’t going to have an assistant or intern request a manuscript just so the assistant or intern can gain experience. Literary agencies are too busy for that. In other words, no one is going to ask to read your manuscript unless they’re truly interested and believe they might be able to sell it.

So, don’t worry about your talent being undiscovered due to the whims or inexperience of an assistant or intern. Nine times out of ten, agents are making the decisions. Not only are they (rightfully) paranoid about missing out on the next big book. They also, nine times out of ten, will tell you they enjoy discovering the next big book.

If you want improve your chance of being discovered…

Click here to see if you’re a fit for an Introductory Coaching Call.

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GET A LITERARY AGENT
Get free access to the Directory of Literary Agents with detailed agent listings to get a traditional publisher
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FREE ACCESS | Literary Agency Directory | Find All Children’s Literary Agents Looking for New Writers 2019-2020

Use our literary agency directory to find all children’s book agents looking for new writers. Our literary agency database includes all publishing agents for children’s literature representing all genres: YA book agents, MG book agents, chapter book agents, and picture book agents. Unlike other literary agency directories, our database is comprehensive, up-to-date, and easy-to-use. It’s also searchable by location, AAR status, book genre, and more. Enter your first name and email address below for FREE INSTANT ACCESS to:

  • 1,000+ listings of all publishing agents for children’s books
  • Detailed literary agent bios for all children’s literary agents
  • List of book genres for all children’s book agents accepting submissions
  • AAR membership status for all publishing agents for children’s literature
  • Preferred query method(s) for all children’s literature book agents
  • Query email addresses for all publishing agents for children’s books
  • Postal mail addresses for all children’s literary agents
  • Photos of all children’s publishing agents accepting submissions
  • Links to all websites for all book agents for children’s literature
  • Links to all social media accounts for all children’s literature book agents
  • Maps to the offices of all literary agents for children’s books

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Literary Agents - Literary Agencies - List
GET A LITERARY AGENT
Get free access to the Directory of Literary Agents with detailed agent listings to get a traditional publisher
Your Information will never be shared with any third party.
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